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1

bindings creak
my weight settles-
spring rain

2

ropes braid
my limbs-
spider's web

3

immobile-
a watchful
fawn

4

suspended
shadow on the wall-
a sapling's quiver

5

mental
timelessness-
herons take flight

6

crescent moon-
the rope master's
work of art
i came up with this idea of blending the poetic style of haiku with the artistic and fetish style of Japanese rope bondage = shibari.

the six haiku are linked as a renga, each piece related to one another.

i hope you as the reader will enjoy the uniqueness of first hand experience in rope fetish, with my growing 'voice' in the beautiful nature that i use to compare one art form to the other.

:bulletorange:06/14/09: submitted the preview photo as my second entry in *moyanII's visual poetry contest

:bulletred:06/05/09: added a preview piece showing one of my working poetry journals open to this renga

:bulletgreen:05/29/09: updated for the peacefulness of it :frail:

:bulletyellow:07/16/08: featured on *DailyDeviants
Add a Comment:
 
:iconscatteredwords:
scatteredwords Featured By Owner Dec 4, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
:heart:
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2013
Little Pixel Heart 
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:iconrlkirkland:
rlkirkland Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
:)
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2013
:happy: 
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:icon007balel:
007Balel Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2011  Student Writer
I really like the originality in this..
Your idea was really good.
I also like the fact that from one to another they are connected.
I get a feeling of waiting for something to happen... an intense feeling of anticipation.
Great work :)
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2011
an intense feeling of anticipation -

exactly...

like being suspended.
Reply
:icon007balel:
007Balel Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2011  Student Writer
:D Yes exactly!!
I am glad I got the feeling right:)
Reply
:iconsilvernium:
silvernium Featured By Owner Dec 11, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
What an original idea! Well executed :)
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2010
:iconbowplz:
Why thank you so much, that means a lot!
Reply
:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Only Jade . . .
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2010
^.^
Reply
:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Did I neglect to mention that this is brilliant?
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Nov 27, 2010
:blushes: oh my -- thank you.
Reply
:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
Nothing but truth, Love. :)
Reply
:iconwrzosowata-iro:
wrzosowata-Iro Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Second is my favourite :)
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2010
Why thank you. ^.^
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Nov 18, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Honestly, I haven't read enough haiku/renga to understand the form. But I'm intrigued by using rope--itself a connector--as the figurative connection here, that too in the context of bondage.

In particular I'm intrigued by the last one. Can't decide how dark the mood is meant to be for it (which is just how I like it).
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2010
It's my homage to the art of Japanese rope bondage - and I'm glad you like the set even if you're not familiar with the form. :heart:
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
It looks very interesting--the notion of turning rope bondage into art, too, uniquely Japanese. :D
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Nov 19, 2010
Having been a practicing haijin for three years now definitely puts me in touch with that uniqueness. <3
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
And how's it working out? :D
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2010
How is "it" working out?
Reply
:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Nov 20, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Understanding the Japanese culture as a haibun--any general influences in your life? :)
Reply
:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
We could do a renga for #BlueMoonBird . . .
Reply
:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
:clap: I love seeing traditional forms enduring a bit of torture.
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2010
why thank you :bow:, Al...

when this piece was first posted it seemed quite unique to those who came by to read it, being something far from traditional in fact...

happily I've received lovely responses ever since. However, does that mean you like the set as well? (no torture was implied in these pieces, but to each his own they say ^.^ )
Reply
:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2010  Hobbyist Writer
By 'torture' I meant that I doubt haiku was ever meant to convey such ideas. And I cannot resist a pun. :XD:

And sorry my answer did not convey that I like the set very much. I should think that collaborative renga, with both roles going back and forth, would be a interesting read. :)
Reply
:iconfootnoting:
Footnoting Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2010
Very instructive in its art of presentation . . .
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2010
:thanks: why thank you.
Reply
:iconfootnoting:
Footnoting Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2010
I am curious as to the poem's provenance.
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2010
There was a time, beginning when I was 17, when I was active in the fetish of BDSM - practices of bondage, etc.

Since I began writing poetry, there are works of mine that reflect when I lived in the "lifestyle" of that fetish, particularly the relation of D/s (dominance-submissive). Once in a while I still enjoy showing the art of this sort of thing.
Reply
:iconfootnoting:
Footnoting Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2010
Are those poems posted? I ask because I have written on that subject myself (briefly here, more extensively elsewhere); and, although my perspective on it is pejorative (I have actually been threatened---two years ago---by one dominant), I am interested in other poetic treatments of the subject.
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:icongrimfairyreaper:
grimfairyreaper Featured By Owner Jun 12, 2009
One day I will go through all the ones I have favorited on you and do an image for each...This one included
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2009
I would be so honored - what a remarkable project to take on - thank you so much! :heart:
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:icongrimfairyreaper:
grimfairyreaper Featured By Owner Jul 2, 2009
yeah when I actually finish something! I still have a partly done one. I think Ill focus on that!
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2009
I would love whatever you do - even the one. :hug:
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:icongrimfairyreaper:
grimfairyreaper Featured By Owner Jul 13, 2009
yay. I will get a working :work:
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:iconiscariot-priest:
Iscariot-Priest Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2009
Interesting set up: as you say it's about shibari, the reader automatically expects to read about bondage in each piece, though many are subverted in some fashion or other. This is shown best in 3, which is my favorite.

Question, in 4, by quiver, do you mean shake- and if so, why is 4 sapling a possessive noun?

I dislike 1 and 5's nature image; each seem a separate image from the body of the poem. What do herons have to do with contemplation while being bound? Are they symbolic of something, and why use a symbol of something that doesn't logically relate to the situation? Unless you, like, have herons outside your house.
Not horrible, just a pet peeve of mine, as I strongly dislike romantic flights of fancy in haiku.

On the flipside, 6 is beautiful, with the dual meaning of crescent moon.
Reply
:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2009
About the best way I can attempt to explain in reply to your exceptions to #1 & #5 haiku in particular would be something like...

this entire renga was an idea I had to meld the mental levels one can reach through the practice of shibari. Not flights of fancy, but actual mental manifestations that can be appreciated only by the one receiving the bondage, and to a secondary degree, the one performing the bondage. I've never seen haiku on the subject the way I have attempted, so the parallels & juxtupositions I draw are more unique. What you call pet peeves should be set aside when it comes to a set such as these six haiku. As for the two you've set aside for closer scrutiny, I'm unable to explain technically, only esthetically - so let's see how I do:

#1: under the spell of being bound, suspended - one's senses become altered. I've heard the sound of rain when the ropes of my suspension adjust to my weight. And if I'm swaying, I seem to hear crickets.

#5: during a session of bondage & suspension - there comes to one a timeless kind of mental flight. In comparison, whenever I've watched herons flying overhead, I'm temporarily unaware of the passing of time. Such peace.

As for #4, I suppose I could've written "a sapling quiver". I still prefer it as "a sapling's quiver".

As for the others, I'm glad to know that you have your favorites among the set - #3, and #6. I thank you again for your detailed comments. It took me a while to answer simply because I was internalizing my own thoughts of where my mindset was at when I wrote the renga, to recall my intentions, so that I might be able to present a competent reply. :)
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:iconiscariot-priest:
Iscariot-Priest Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2009
Hmm...I guess when explained the choices make sense. However, an outsider (like I was pre-explanation) would be pretty lost to the meaning of the pieces. In my philosophy, haiku should at least present one idea understandable to the layman. The counter argument that haiku should present a fresh take on an image is moot, if the poor reader doesn't even grasp the image.
Sure there may be layers of meaning only those with the esoteric knowledge can enjoy, but when looking at say Madonna of the Rocks, I'd like to be able to at least think "wow, a beautiful portrait", even if the deeper symbolism is lost on me. For instance, in #2, there's the literal reading of the haiku, then there are additional interpretations as well. Beautiful use of juxtaposition.

And in #4, is "sapling's quiver" a quiver of arrows made of young wood or something else? Again, such an unusual image it's somewhat hard to follow.

But, meh, that's the whole point of personal philosophy: what ever blows your sails. In my case, I'm too much of a simpleton to enjoy a spattering of Pollock.
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2009
Well see, that's the whole thing about the long hard row to hoe when it comes to any of us trying to enlighten the millions who don't understand haiku at all, no matter what the subject (some just plain hate poetry in general, and haiku inparticular - I've seen such feelings right here on dA)... Trees, rocks, temple bells, cherry blossoms, your horse turds, or my rope fetish. It's all subjective and indeed very much an individual choice and most certainly an acquired taste, wouldn't you say?

So I was thrilled to do this renga and I believe the joy and beauty I found comes across in the individual pieces. As for the sapling's quiver - it trembles at the slightest sensations, being slim and young and green. Sounds pretty simple to me. ;p

Thanks again for your exchange with me. :)
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:iconiscariot-priest:
Iscariot-Priest Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2009
So it was a quivering sapling. Oh goodness, the phrasing really threw me. :B
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2009
sorry about that :hug:
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:iconsomnomollior:
somnomollior Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2009   Writer
It is a pleasure to see your elegant hand-writing.
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:iconjade-pandora:
jade-pandora Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2009
thank you so much, dear Cat :heart:
Reply
:iconmattiello:
Mattiello Featured By Owner May 29, 2009  Professional Writer
Can you explain your deviation from the traditional or otherwise usual syllable counts?
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:iconiscariot-priest:
Iscariot-Priest Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2009
Your question and Jade's answer seem to be standard back and forth for this issue, so I'd like to give you an alternate view on this.

Let's say we want to follow Japanese syllables, there's the problem of their syllables being different from ours. Onji (sound syllables) are shorter, more like "do", "re", "mi". English on the other hand views "light" as a single syllable. By Japanese standards, it's more like three onji. In fact haiku is two syllables, but it's three onji.

Then there's the next problem - cutting words. These things signify where the line breaks, working like punctuation. Assuming every time you use punctuation/pause (comma, dash, ellipses), that counts as using a cutting word. So in "three" lines, let's just use the one in the second "line"; leaving you with 16 sound syllables. (5-6-5).

So it'd look something like:

do-re-mi-fa-so
do-re-mi-fa-so-ti (dash)
do-re-mi-fa-so

Let's fill in the blanks, and use a kigo too (summer sun):

a Summer sun
through the rain -
lacks warmth

==

Alternately, you could say you're part of the New Haiku Movement, who've been moving away from the 5-7-5 + kigo rule since the early 1900s and call it a day.
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:iconmattiello:
Mattiello Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2009  Professional Writer
Wow, thank you for the wonderful explanation. Simply excellent.
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